Photography Project Showing Mormon Women Like Never Before: Vulnerable Yet Empowered

mormon women bare

There are a lot of things about the Mormon religion that are common knowledge to the world, as with any major religion or faith that has been around for centuries. In particular with Mormons, is that they have to wear special underwear and have a strict code on modesty.

One women who has been a lifelong member of the Church of Jesus Christ and the Latter Day Saints, Katrina Anderson has decided she wants to show the world a different side of women, and empower them in a whole new way, without taking away from their faith.

Katrina is a photographer based in Salt Lake City, Utah which was founded by Brigham Young, and other founding fathers of the Mormon religion. That kinda gives you an idea of the environment most men, women, and children grow up in living there.

30 year old Katrina launched a project in July 2013 called ‘Mormon Women Bare‘ which features a group of Mormon women posing nude in a way to show vulnerability in a whole new way. It was also to protest against a system that has forced women to at times feel shameful of their bodies, which the younger generation clearly want to fight against.

“I know that images can be very powerful tools for change,’ the 30-year-old told MailOnline. ‘For the women who chose to be photographed, this act of artistic expression helps them reclaim their bodies while protesting a system that has told them they must remain covered and careful.”

The idea came about in 2012 when stories of cultural modesty regarding women in the Mormon church were being reported, and it make Katrina think more on how women treat each other because of this mandate.

There were reports of girls “shaming” other girls for not dressing modestly enough, a college student not being allowed to take an exam because her jeans were too tight and many more like these which made Katrina frustrated with how extreme these rules have become.

When she started her photography project, Katrina was surprised to have no shortage of volunteers once she spread the word about the project. So far there has been no official ‘church discipline” toward her, and her own husband openly supports what she is doing.

Eventually she would like this project to open the hearts and minds of not only just women within the Mormon church, but in greater society also. The message she is sending is not only about freedom, but empowerment and confidence to be women who embrace their flaws and don’t feel disillusioned by the media, the church or anyone else.

By seeing what women really look like proves incredibly powerful,’ she said. ‘We are so bombarded with reasons to feel shame about our bodies,” she said.

“Most of the images we see of women’s bodies are very thin, very “ideal”. In reality, very few of us fit that so-called ideal. It is unrealistic to expect all of us to be perfectly thin and sculpted, with perky breasts and no cellulite.”

“For women to see that other women are not perfect and yet are absolutely stunning is immensely affirming. . . Women of different shapes, sizes, and ages demonstrate that bodies need not bring shame but can be owned, celebrated, and honored.”

Overall she has had 30 women participate in the series, and hopes to continue shooting more. Katrina would like to showcase more ethnic diversity as well as older women too, both groups she is currently lacking and therefore feels it is important to widen the scope to inspire women within the Mormon church as well as outside.

“I hope that women see this and have more compassion for themselves and their bodies. I hope that men see this and realize that women should not be objectified, even if seen nude. I see the project as a celebration of women and the human form. I hope others see that as well.”

mormon women bare

3 Comments

  1. Wonderful pictures. I’m quite surprised she hasn’t had major objections from the church. Perhaps they too are ready for a positive change?

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.